Adopting Social Spaces in your Workplace

furniture & interiors

Resurging as a necessary element of an office’s design, social spaces such as kitchens, breakout spaces or pods have become something of a growing corporate zeitgeist. With more and more modern industries beginning to focus on mental wellbeing and its positive implications on the workplace, as well as physical wellbeing, contemporary solutions were needed to …

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Resurging as a necessary element of an office’s design, social spaces such as kitchens, breakout spaces or pods have become something of a growing corporate zeitgeist. With more and more modern industries beginning to focus on mental wellbeing and its positive implications on the workplace, as well as physical wellbeing, contemporary solutions were needed to allow businesses to concentrate on their colleague’s productivity and motivation. Introducing or remodelling social spaces in your organisation can carry forward many benefits and allow you to make the most of the space you have available to you. In this post, we will be discussing how these kinds of spaces can affect team dynamics, personal capabilities and also the ways in which you can integrate these into your office or workplace.

According to a report from Merchant Savvy in 2019, around 20% of UK workers are working remotely, which puts them in 5th place as compared to the rest of Europe. With likely more and more becoming self-employed and working remotely, it’s easy to interpret that people prefer to work in homely locations where they can freely move around and take breaks, so why don’t offices adapt to this trend? By introducing a neutral space, such as a café style breakfast bar, you allow your workers to relax and unwind when needed without creating an atmosphere of unprofessionalism through homely furnishings and furniture throughout the office. The reason why the majority of office workers still work at an office rather than at home may not be as simple as the lack of flexibility to work remotely, but more to do with the fact that the human condition is social by nature. By spending up to 5 days a week with other people we maintain a necessary social quota, but what if we do more than maintain it, and instead encourage the positive consequences of socialising to bloom in a working environment through social spaces.

How do we implement social spaces into our workplace?

The difficulty with adding in these kinds of social spaces into your organisation can be choosing the right products to create a professional, dynamic and friendly area, and as experienced consultants within the industry, we’ve had clients who’ve faced these difficulties before they worked with us. Some effective ways to create these kinds of informal, yet presentable, socialising centres for your employees and visitors are kitchens, breakout spaces, breakfast bars, pods and general lounge areas. Each with their own levels of scope and integrated features, you can find a social space which matches the message of your business. If you’re a business that relies on your ability to connect and network, then perhaps a café style breakfast bar can provide a neutral area for you to discuss business or personal relationships with a nice cup of coffee by your side. Maybe you run a digital agency, such as an IT firm, and need a place with brighter colours and open windows to inspire creativity and create a contrast from potentially monotonous variants of work. Whatever your situation, your organisation can benefit from a unique and appropriate form of a social space.

More than just a place to collaborate

Some organisations will not have these social facilities for their employees, as they instil a strict separation between work and home, but social spaces go beyond just providing a place for your employees to socialise, interact and collaborate, they also provide a space for them to take screen breaks. Due to recent research and studies being popularised in media, many industries now require that their staff take regular screen breaks to avoid fatigue and stress, as well as receiving time to walk outside or drink water. DSE (Display Screen Equipment) regulations suggest that regular breaks of 1-2 minutes after every hour can be largely beneficial to avoid issues with overworking, staring at a screen for too long and stress.

The fact is this, organisations that value their employee’s time, mental health and ability to communicate provide them with spaces to help them restore, reenergise and reflect on their activities. To properly foster collaborative efforts within your organisation, spaces like these allow for a space away from the office or workplace where your employees’ creativity can flourish. To help our customers with this, we’ve undertaken projects that install breakout areas like kitchens and pods which isolate the inhabitants from the main work space so they can concentrate on the project at hand or simply socialise more with the members of their team.

If you and your business are looking for practical ways to introduce social spaces that are relevant to your layout and mission statement, then we can certainly help. Get in touch with our experienced team today to discover more about the many benefits of social spaces and breakout areas.